Janklow & Nesbit UK
Headshot of author Jules Montague
Photo credit: Mat Smith

Jules Montague

Doctor Jules Montague is a neurologist and author. Born in Dublin, Jules studied Medicine at Trinity College and moved to London twelve years ago. She writes about health and science for the BBC, Lancet, Guardian and Observer. She has spoken at TEDx London and appeared on BBC Radio 4 and Sky News.

Her bestselling book, Lost and Found: Why Losing Our Memories Doesn't Mean Losing Ourselves (Sceptre 2018), explores what remains of the person when the pieces of their mind go missing - from dementia and brain injury to sleep disorders and multiple personality disorder. Lost and Found has featured on BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 3, Sky News and in the Sunday Times Daily Mail, and Telegraph.

The Imaginary Patient: How Diagnosis Gets Us Wrong (Granta 2022) explores how the practice of diagnosis is tainted by the forces of imperialism, politics, discrimination and Big Pharma. Jules speaks to parents fighting for recognition of their children's symptoms; men and women whose bodies have been stigmatised by society; and to the families of young black men who are being diagnosed posthumously with a condition that could exonerate their killers. Through these stories of heartbreak and resilience, Montague shines a light on the troubled state of diagnosis, and asks how we might begin to heal.

Lost and Found: Why Losing Our Memories Doesn't Mean Losing Ourselves

Sceptre
Lost and Found: Why Losing Our Memories Doesn't Mean Losing Ourselves

The Imaginary Patient: How Diagnosis Gets Us Wrong

Granta
The Imaginary Patient: How Diagnosis Gets Us Wrong